Mold Testing

Mold testing

Mold Removal Is A 3-Step Process

mold removal is a 3-step processMold removal is a three-step process. First, it includes  the mold assessment phase to document the problem through an inspection as well as mold testing to assess the degree of mold contamination; second. the mold remediation phase to fix the problem; and, finally the post-remediation phase which insures that the mold remediation has been performed properly and the air quality is within the normal range.

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Can Mold Testing Prove A Building Is Mold-Free?

can mold testing prove a building is mold freeThe answer is no! Mold testing does not prove or guarantee that a building is mold-free. Some home-buyers mistakably equate mold testing as insuring a mold-free building.

No-one can guarantee 100% that a home is mold-free, and this is why:

If we tested every room of a typical 3 bedroom home, we would have, as a minimum, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, a kitchen, a living room, a dining room, and a laundry room.  That’s 9 rooms plus the outdoor sample making a total of 10 air samples.

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When Is Mold Testing Warranted?

when is mold testing warrantedThe question as to when mold testing is warranted is dictated by the goal or objective of the homeowners or building occupants.  Many people who call for a mold inspection actually only need mold testing.  Once we start asking questions about their objective, 95% of the time we will recommend mold testing over a formal inspection of the entire building.

We recognize that every situation is different and there are times

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Is Mold Testing Following Remediation Necessary?

is mold testing following remediation necessaryMold testing following mold remediation, known as post-remediation testing, is an absolute must!  This verification testing  ensures that the mold remediation has been performed correctly, as evidenced by the laboratory results, which should show that the levels of mold spores are within the normal range for all types of mold spores compared to an outside control sample.

After mold remediation is completed, but before containment is removed and before any reconstruction has taken place, such as closing the wall by installing new drywall, a post remediation testing is necessary.  No matter how “clean” the area remediated may be, skipping this mold testing is not a good idea.

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Is ERMI Testing Reliable To Test A Home For Mold? – Part 1

Beware! The EPA mold scale ERMI© is misleading

By
Charles and Danielle Dobbs

EERMI testingRMI testing, developed by the EPA to test a home for mold is, in our opinion, totally meaningless, flawed, and impractical.  This post is actually a paper we published several years ago, and we thought the information would interest our readers.  The post is in two-parts.  The first part, Is ERMI Testing Reliable to Test a Home For Mold, explains how the ERMI test was developed.  In the second part, we point out the flaws of ERMI testing.

ERMI testing involves testing a home for mold with a single dust sample.

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Is ERMI Testing Reliable To Test A Home For Mold? – Part 2

Beware! The EPA mold scale ERMI© is misleading

By
Charles and Danielle Dobbs

ERMI testingIn part 1 of “Is ERMI Testing Reliable To Test A Home For Mold?” we explained the research behind ERMI testing, now here are the flaws:

FLAW NUMBER 1
Improper sample selection of “moldy” and “non-moldy” homes
First, the homes were classified as either “moldy” or “non-moldy” based on the following criteria.  The paper states:

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Types Of Mold Testing

types of mold testingThere are three main types of mold testing – air samples, surface samples, and carpet samples.   We feel ERMI testing, developed by the EPA, is totally meaningless, and therefore we will not mention it in this post, but we will explain in detail in an upcoming article. Incidently,  self-testing mold kits are also meaningless, see Mold Test Kits – Are They Reliable?

Sampling is the scientific approach to mold assessment.  Mold testing provides a snapshot of the environment at the time of sampling at a particular location, as conditions can change over time.

Air sampling methods include  Culturable and non-culturable samples.  The culturable method allows the microbiologist to differentiate between species whose spores are visually similar, but it takes longer to obtain the results and it is also more costly.  In addition,

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